Thursday, October 22
TOPIC: Team Structure
Thursday, October 22
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm
Live Stream: Join stream
Recorded Video: Watch video

Speakers

  • Corinne Coen (Speaker) Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University
  • Ernest Park (Speaker) Associate Professor, Grand Valley State University

Description

This is the spot for our facilitated session on group and team Structure.  This will be a synchronous event that you can access using the video icon. We encourage you to review the executive summaries and videos of the accepted INGRoup 2020 Conference papers associated with this session that are listed below in the sub-sessions.  Please leave comments, questions, and chats for the authors of the papers below! Also, please leave comments, questions, and chats to help the facilitators prepare for this live session. Finally, if you are interested in attending this event, please add it to your agenda so that we can accurately prepare for the number of participants in the Zoom meeting!

Subsessions

Thursday, October 22
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Description

Authors: Nakama, Daisuke; Takemura, Kosuke

This study investigates contingencies when the vertical member difference affects group success, by focusing on the type of the purpose of collaboration as a moderator. We conducted the Human Resource (HR) data analysis of work teams and a group experiment in laboratory to examine practical significance and specify causal relationship.

Thursday, October 22
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm
Recorded Video: Watch video

Description

Authors: Graupensperger, Scott; Evans, M. Blair

This study examined adherence to drinking norms within college peer groups (sport clubs). We examined associations between self-reported alcohol use and perceived descriptive/injunctive norms as an indicator of norm-adherence and then tested moderating effects of social constructs related to the group: Social identification strength, indegree centrality, and network density.

Thursday, October 22
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm
Recorded Video: Watch video

Description

Authors: Reedy, Justin; Anderson, Chris

Despite the growth in studies of groups and teams, group scholarship has insufficiently addressed security-related groups. We explore two case studies, an environmental management discussion group and a domestic terrorist group, through the lens of Embedded Systems Theory, and argue for broader group-based analysis in the context of security.

Thursday, October 22
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Description

Authors: Wang, Shirley; McLarnon, Matthew; O'Neill, Thomas

In the present research, we combine three levels of analysis—the individual, dyad, and team, to explore the effects of an individual’s centrality in his or her team's conflict network. The effects of one’s network positioning vary as a function of conflict type, indegree versus outdegree centrality, and type of outcome.

Thursday, October 22
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm
Recorded Video: Watch video

Description

Authors: Kim, Sijun; McClean, Elizabeth J.; Doyle, Sarah P.; Podsakoff, Nathan P.; Lin, Eric; Woodruff, Todd

We examine how social status is related to leader’s ratings of team member voice and find that there are two opposing pathways: a positive path via instrumental network centrality and a negative path via perceived image risk. We further show that these relationships are contingent upon team interpersonal relationship quality.

Thursday, October 22
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Description

Authors: Liu, Yonghong ; Todorova, Gergana

Using data from 1137 dyads in 125 teams, we show two team members affiliated with the same identity-based subgroup work closer and help each other more than those affiliated with different subgroups. Thus, they experience greater relationship harmony. Team faultlines weaken the positive effect of dyad-level helping on relationship harmony.

Thursday, October 22
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Description

Authors: Bao, Lili; Coen, Corinne

Using a computer simulation, we explore how different team structural adaptations influence team performance. We find that reintegrated and elastic adaptation perform the best because they gain the benefits of efficiency and exploration realized by decentralization, while they also achieve the benefits of integration for internal fit caused by centralization.

Thursday, October 22
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm
Recorded Video: Watch video

Description

Authors: Schmutz, Jan B.; Bienefeld, Nadine; Maynard, Travis

We introduce the concept of team extremeness, a theoretical framework that defines extremeness based on the three dimensions environmental extremeness, task extremeness and outcome extremeness. Each team can be categorized by its level of extremeness and is placed on the extremeness continuum taking into account the unique context.

Thursday, October 22
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Description

Authors: Karaduman, Cana; Meslec, Nicoleta; Oerlemans, Leon

A within-subject experimental design (information load: low vs. high) where participants (N= 34) role-played a disaster-response management team, provided support for our hypothesis on the negative effect of information load on retrospective duration judgments.. We also found moderation effects of stress and ego network diversity.

Thursday, October 22
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Description

Authors: Caylor, Jesse R.; Bigerton, Kayla L.; Duong, Ngoc S.; Warren, Catherine; Deepak, Pratihba; Wildman, Jessica L.

Using the Categorization-Elaboration Model and a preliminary analysis of growth patterns, we discuss the implications of diversity faultlines for longitudinal changes in the subcomponents of transactive memory systems (coordination, credibility, specialization). In doing so, we set the groundwork for future research on how faultlines/subgroups influence team cognition over time.

Thursday, October 22
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm
Recorded Video: Watch video

Description

Authors: Gramsch Calvo, Tristán Ignacio

Abstinence studies argue that ‘close’ people can provide support to drug users seeking soberness. Contrarily, this paper argues that drug users discuss hurtful topics with distant people who support them. Results are consistent with findings on weak ties and open the discussion to new perspectives in rehabilitation strategies.

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