Max Harlow

Senior Newsroom Developer, Financial Times

Max Harlow is a newsroom developer at the Financial Times in London. He has previously worked on investigations at the Guardian and at the Bureau of Investigative Journalism. He co-runs Journocoders, a group for journalists who want to develop technical skills for use in their reporting.

Max is speaking at

Data
September 27, 2019
10:45 am - 12:00 pm
Room 2.107, HafenCity Universität (HCU)

Limited Seating

42 of 42 seats filled

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Speaker

  • Max Harlow (Speaker) Senior Newsroom Developer, Financial Times

Description

Have you heard the term ‘command line’ and wondered what it was?

The command line is a way of interacting with a computer by typing commands instead of pointing and clicking. But it is so much more important than that -- if you are taking your first steps with data and code, knowing your way around the command line is essential. There are also many useful and powerful applications that can help you in your work that only run on the command line -- understanding it opens the door to making use of these power tools.

This session will tell you how the command line works and what it's best at. We'll cover the basic commands and concepts you need to navigate the command line, and I’ll also talk about some of the key tools which can be useful in data investigations, including a few story examples.

Data Data Hands-On
September 28, 2019
4:15 pm - 5:30 pm
Room 2.108, HafenCity Universität (HCU)

Limited Seating

30 of 30 seats filled

Download the Whova app to reserve your seat!

Speaker

  • Max Harlow (Speaker) Senior Newsroom Developer, Financial Times

Description

Exploring networks with graph databases (Class 1)

In data journalism, we tend to use relational databases – data in table form – such as Excel or SQL to do our analysis and find stories. Graph databases are different, but are incredibly useful to find connections or patterns within our data that would be difficult, if not impossible, to spot using a relational database. This session will provide a hands-on introduction to graph database Neo4j, showing examples of its use for investigative stories including the Panama Papers, and demonstrate how to build a graph database of political donations and match them with corporate data to see at a glance the networks involved.

Exploring networks with graph databases (Class 2)

In part two, you will learn to analyse your newly built graph database using Cypher, Neo4j's query language. It is advisable to have completed part one to get the most out of this session.

Software requirements: The software we are using for graph databases is Neo4j, which can be downloaded from here. It has a standard installer that sets everything up that’s needed.

Important Advisory: Hands-on classes are limited to 30 seats. Please sign up only if you are serious about taking the class. Signing up does not ensure you will get in. The first 20 attendees will get in and be able to use the conference laptops, which are PCs pre-loaded with software and data. The next 10 attendees will need their own laptops and software noted in the course description. If you see online that a class already has 30 sign-ups do not hesitate to still sign up, as seats often open up. We will try to repeat popular classes later in the conference. Thanks for your understanding.

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