John Freemuth

Distinguished Professor of Public Policy and Cecil Andrus Endowed Chair of Environment and Public Lands, Boise State University

John Freemuth is Distinguished Professor of Public Policy and Cecil Andrus Endowed Chair of Environment and Public Lands at Boise State University. His primary interest is with the public lands of the United States and has written a number of books and articles and given over 100 presentations on our public lands. He chaired the Science Advisory Board of the Bureau of Land Management, after being appointed by Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt. He is principal investigator on a grant from the United States Geological Survey, involving in part mapping the protected areas of the United States (PAD US) and with the Andrus Center is working on a grant from the Bureau of Land Management on policy issues surrounding BLM. He has been a high school teacher, and seasonal park ranger. While a ranger, at Glen Canyon National Recreation Area he wrote “Wanderer for Beauty: Everett Ruess in the Glen Canyon Area”, a park interpretive handout and is glad Everett has yet to be found. Waldo Ruess, Everett’s brother, sent him a letter where he said he enjoyed reading it. He has a BA from Pomona College and a PhD. from Colorado State University. He was also named the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching /CAES of Professor of the Year for Idaho for 2001.

John is speaking at

October 10, 2019
7:00 am - 5:00 pm

Speakers

  • Sadie Babits (Tour Leader) Independent Editor, Journalist
  • Amanda Peacher (Tour Leader) Public Radio Journalist
  • Tom Yulsman (Tour Leader) Director, Center for Environmental Journalism
  • Hanem Abouelezz (Speaker) Supervisory Landscape Ecologist, Rocky Mountain National Park
  • Jill Baron (Speaker) US Geological Survey
  • John Freemuth (Speaker) Distinguished Professor of Public Policy and Cecil Andrus Endowed Chair of Environment and Public Lands, Boise State University
  • Doug Kenney (Speaker) University of Colorado
  • Tom Veblen (Speaker) University of Colorado Boulder

Description

(7:00 a.m. departure, $45 fee, lunch included)

This tour is full. If you wish to be put on the waiting list, contact Kevin Beaty.

Colorado is best known for its majestic mountains, 59 of which exceed 14,000 feet. Yet nearly 40 percent of the state consists of high plains. This will allow us to make a grand environmental transect on our trip up to Rocky Mountain National Park. Within just a few hours, we’ll pass through roughly the same number of ecological zones as a trip from Fort Collins to Alaska. We’ll begin our transect at the foot of the mountains where we’ll get an overview of the day ahead and discuss pressing Western water issues. Next, we’ll plunge into the Big Thompson Canyon to learn about forest ecology and wildfire. Our transect will then take us into the gateway town of Estes Park and finally into the park itself. While there, we’ll hear about impacts on park ecosystems from pollution, massive tourism, over-population of elk and other factors — all against a backdrop of climate change. Total drive time: 4 hours. Good for those looking for some exercise.

Advance registration is required for all Thursday tours. Attendance on each tour is strictly limited, so registering early is important. All Thursday tours will return to the Lory Student Center at about 5:00 p.m.

IMPORTANT DEPARTURE INFORMATION: Please meet your tour leaders near the SEJ registration desk on the third floor of the Lory Student Center at the listed departure time to check-in for your tour. Eat breakfast at your hotel before arrival or plan to purchase breakfast at the Lory Student Center food court, which opens at 7:00 a.m.; coffee and snacks will be provided for tours that depart before the food court opens. Each tour will leave the ballroom as a group to board buses at a nearby location. Do not be late.

October 11, 2019
9:00 am - 10:45 am
Grand Ballroom, CSU's Lory Student Center

Speakers

  • Mayor Wade Troxell (Opening Remarks) City of Fort Collins
  • Juliet Eilperin (Moderator) Senior National Affairs Correspondent, The Washington Post
  • Whit Fosburgh (Speaker) TRCP
  • John Freemuth (Speaker) Distinguished Professor of Public Policy and Cecil Andrus Endowed Chair of Environment and Public Lands, Boise State University
  • Dina Gilio-Whitaker (Speaker) Lecturer, American Indian Studies, California State University San Marcos
  • Shea Loper (Speaker) Director, U.S. Government Relations, Encana Corporation
  • William Perry Pendley (Speaker) Deputy Director, Policy and Programs, Bureau of Land Management, exercising authority of BLM director

Description

The U.S. has a long and storied history of land conservation, which has created a network of public lands now managed in different ways. Since Europeans arrived, these lands have been fought over between those looking to preserve them and those hoping to open them up to development. These public lands now face threats from climate change, including drought and wildfire, along with budget and staff cuts. Recreational impacts, along with drilling and mining, are on the rise. Tribal officials are demanding a greater voice in federal decision-making, and Trump administration officials are scaling back regulations. What does the future hold for America's public lands?

This event will be live-streamed on Facebook.

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