Andrew Ko

University of Washington, Seattle

Andrew is speaking at

10:45 am - 12:00 pm
322

Speaker

  • Brianna Blaser (Speakers) DO-IT Counselor/Coordinator, University of Washington
  • Andrew Ko (Speakers) University of Washington, Seattle
  • Richard Ladner (Speakers) Professor Emeritus, University of Washington
  • Kristen Shinohara (Speakers) Assistant Professor, Rochester Institute of Technology

Description

PRESENTERS

Brianna Blaser, Andrew J. Ko, Richard E. Ladner, University of Washington, Kristen Shinohara, Rochester Institute of Technology

ABSTRACT

This special session will engage teachers on what and how to teach accessibility and disability related topics in their computing courses. We know from the survey by Shinohara et al. [7] that many computing faculty are interested in teaching these topics but do not feel comfortable doing so because they do not have sufficient knowledge to integrate it into their specific courses. The goal of this special session is to provide teachers the beginnings of the knowledge needed and also provide them resources that will enable them to build on that knowledge.

2:10 pm - 2:35 pm
319

Speaker

  • Andrew Ko (Speakers) University of Washington, Seattle
  • Richard Ladner (Speakers) Professor Emeritus, University of Washington
  • Kristen Shinohara (Speakers) Assistant Professor, Rochester Institute of Technology
  • Saba Kawas (Speakers) Research Assistant, University of Washington

Description

Kristen Shinohara (Rochester Institute of Technology, United States)

Saba Kawas (University of Washington, United States)

Andrew J. Ko (University of Washington, United States)

Richard E. Ladner (University of Washington, United States)

ABSTRACT. Industry demand for software developers with knowledge of accessibility has increased substantially in recent years. However, there is little knowledge about the prevalence of higher education teaching about accessibility or faculty’s perceived barriers to teaching accessibility. To address this gap, we surveyed 14,176 computing and information science faculty in the United States. We received a representative sample of at least one response from 318 of the 352 institutions we surveyed, totaling 1,857 responses. We found that 175 institutions (50%) had at least one instructor teaching accessibility and that no fewer than 2.5% of faculty overall teach accessibility. Faculty that teach accessibility are twice as likely to be female, to have expertise in HCI and software engineering, and to know people with disabilities. The most critical barriers to teaching accessibility that faculty reported were the absence of clear and discipline-specifi€c accessibility learning objectives and the lack of faculty knowledge about accessibility. Faculty desired resources that were speci€fic to the areas of computing in which they teach rather than general accessibility resources and guidelines.

3:45 pm - 5:00 pm
323

Speaker

  • Andrew Ko (Speaker) University of Washington, Seattle

Description

CHAIR: Andrew Ko (University of Washington, United States)

4:35 pm - 5:00 pm
321

Speaker

  • Andrew Ko (Speakers) University of Washington, Seattle
  • Benjamin Xie (Speakers) Graduate Research Assistant, University of Washington Information School
  • Greg Nelson (Speakers) University of Washington

Description

Benjamin Xie (University of Washington, United States)

Greg L. Nelson (University of Washington, United States)

Andrew J. Ko (University of Washington, United States)

ABSTRACT. We propose and evaluate a lightweight strategy for tracing code that can be efficiently taught to novice programmers, building off of recent findings on the effectiveness of "sketching" when tracing. This strategy helps novice programmers apply the syntactic and semantic knowledge they are learning by encouraging line-by-line tracing and providing an external representation of memory for students to update. To evaluate the effect of teaching this strategy, we conducted a block-randomized experiment with 24 novices enrolled in a university-level CS1 course. We spent only 5-10 minutes introducing the strategy to the experimental condition. We then asked both conditions to think-aloud as they predicted the output of short programs. Students using this strategy scored on average 15% higher than students in the control group for the tracing problems used the study (p<0.05). Qualitative analysis of think-aloud and interview data showed that tracing systematically (going line-by-line and "sketching" intermediate values) led to better performance and that the strategy scaffolded and encouraged systematic tracing. Students who learned the strategy also scored on average 7% higher on the course midterm. These findings suggest that in <1 hour and without computer-based tools, we can improve CS1 students' tracing abilities by explicitly teaching a strategy.

1:45 pm - 2:10 pm
316

Speaker

  • Andrew Ko (Speakers) University of Washington, Seattle
  • Katie Davis (Speakers) University of Washington, United States
  • Jason Yip (Speakers) University of Washington, United States
  • Leanne Hwa (Speakers) University of Washington

Description

Andrew Ko (University of Washington, United States)

Leanne Hwa (University of Washington, United States)

Katie Davis (University of Washington, United States)

Jason Yip (University of Washington, United States)

ABSTRACT. Influencing adolescent interest in computing is key to engaging diverse teens in computer science learning. Prior work suggests that informal mentorship may be a powerful way to trigger and maintain interest in computing, but we still know little about how mentoring relationships form, how mentors trigger and maintain interest, or what qualities adolescents value in informal mentors. In a 3-week career exploration class with 18 teens from underrepresented groups, we had students write extensively about their informal computing mentors. In analyzing their writing, we found that most teens had informal computing mentors, that mentors were typically teachers, friends, and older siblings (and not parents or school counselors), and that what teens desired most were informal mentors that were patient, helpful, inspiring, and knowledgeable. These findings suggest that computing mentors can come in many forms, that they must be patient, helpful, and inspiring, but that they also require content knowledge about computing to be meaningful. Future work might explore what knowledge of computing is sufficient to empower teachers, parents, peers, and family to be effective computing mentors.

8:45 am - 10:00 am
322

Speaker

  • Brianna Blaser (Speakers) DO-IT Counselor/Coordinator, University of Washington
  • Andrew Ko (Speakers) University of Washington, Seattle
  • Richard Ladner (Speakers) Professor Emeritus, University of Washington

Description

PRESENTERS

Brianna Blaser, Andrew J. Ko, Richard E. Ladner, University of Washington

ABSTRACT

This special session will address how to include students with disabilities in computing classes and other educational activities at all levels of education,: K-12, college, and graduate school. There will a review of known pedagogical strategies and technical accommodations that students with and without disabilities can benefit from, as well as breakouts to discuss practical issues around inclusion of students with disabilities.

CHAIR: Richard Ladner (University of Washington, United States)

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