Kristen Shinohara

Assistant Professor, Rochester Institute of Technology

Kristen is speaking at

10:45 am - 12:00 pm
322

Speaker

  • Brianna Blaser (Speakers) DO-IT Counselor/Coordinator, University of Washington
  • Andrew Ko (Speakers) University of Washington, Seattle
  • Richard Ladner (Speakers) Professor Emeritus, University of Washington
  • Kristen Shinohara (Speakers) Assistant Professor, Rochester Institute of Technology

Description

PRESENTERS

Brianna Blaser, Andrew J. Ko, Richard E. Ladner, University of Washington, Kristen Shinohara, Rochester Institute of Technology

ABSTRACT

This special session will engage teachers on what and how to teach accessibility and disability related topics in their computing courses. We know from the survey by Shinohara et al. [7] that many computing faculty are interested in teaching these topics but do not feel comfortable doing so because they do not have sufficient knowledge to integrate it into their specific courses. The goal of this special session is to provide teachers the beginnings of the knowledge needed and also provide them resources that will enable them to build on that knowledge.

2:10 pm - 2:35 pm
319

Speaker

  • Andrew Ko (Speakers) University of Washington, Seattle
  • Richard Ladner (Speakers) Professor Emeritus, University of Washington
  • Kristen Shinohara (Speakers) Assistant Professor, Rochester Institute of Technology
  • Saba Kawas (Speakers) Research Assistant, University of Washington

Description

Kristen Shinohara (Rochester Institute of Technology, United States)

Saba Kawas (University of Washington, United States)

Andrew J. Ko (University of Washington, United States)

Richard E. Ladner (University of Washington, United States)

ABSTRACT. Industry demand for software developers with knowledge of accessibility has increased substantially in recent years. However, there is little knowledge about the prevalence of higher education teaching about accessibility or faculty’s perceived barriers to teaching accessibility. To address this gap, we surveyed 14,176 computing and information science faculty in the United States. We received a representative sample of at least one response from 318 of the 352 institutions we surveyed, totaling 1,857 responses. We found that 175 institutions (50%) had at least one instructor teaching accessibility and that no fewer than 2.5% of faculty overall teach accessibility. Faculty that teach accessibility are twice as likely to be female, to have expertise in HCI and software engineering, and to know people with disabilities. The most critical barriers to teaching accessibility that faculty reported were the absence of clear and discipline-specifi€c accessibility learning objectives and the lack of faculty knowledge about accessibility. Faculty desired resources that were speci€fic to the areas of computing in which they teach rather than general accessibility resources and guidelines.

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